You may be surprised to hear that Scotland has been in the midst of a heatwave this summer. One of my good friends is a self-confessed nature lover so there was nowhere better to spend her 30th birthday than the great outdoors. We made our way to St Andrews, a small coastal town northeast of Edinburgh.

I guess before I continue, anyone who has clicked on this post expecting to read anything other than a post about our afternoon crab fishing, shame on you 😉

What is Crab Fishing ?

Crab Fishing or ‘Crabbing’ as it’s otherwise known is a classic British seaside activity. This is something which seems to have passed me by as a child, despite growing up both in the countryside and close to the coast. All you need to start crabbing is a bucket, some bacon as bait and a crab line or net. Crab lines generally only cost a few pounds and can be easily found on Amazon.

The crab mobile

The Technique

Place a piece of bacon at the end of the line or in the net and then lower into the water until it hits the bottom. Crabbing doesn’t require too much skill. Basically, the crabs either grab onto the bacon or they don’t. It’s mostly about the timing and making sure you pull the line up slowly.

On a few occasions I found the bacon gone, but no crab to be found. Some Asian tourists excitedly hovered a drone over our heads as we fished which was slightly off putting. I blame that for my poor success rate!

How to Hold a Crab

The safest way to hold a crab for you and for them is to take your thumb and your forefinger and tightly hold the widest part of the shell, under the pincer legs. This will prevent the crab from being able to pinch you.

The Bucket

During your fishing session, it’s important not to place too many crabs in the bucket. They may become stressed and start to fight if they are within such close proximity of each other. It would also be advisable to place some rocks and seaweed into the bucket to make it as homely as possible for the short time they are in there.

And finally…

No crabbing session would be complete without some David Attenborough style voice over and of course, once you are done for the day, some well deserved fish and chips. So, nets at the ready, unleash your inner child and get crabbing!

Please note that no crabs were hurt in the making of this blog post. All crabs were released back into their natural habitat.

3 Replies to “How I Caught Crabs”

  1. I’ll admit that I did a double-take when I read the title of this post, but then I thought, “No, she can’t mean THAT.” I have to say I really enjoy your posts and writing style. I don’t often follow back these days because I’m getting overwhelmed with faithfully reading the posts of everyone I’ve followed, but every once in a while I find one I really want to follow back, and yours is one of them! I also have to say that I know people who would classify your activity as “bacon abuse” or at the very least, “criminal misuse of bacon,” but I’m not one of them. Bacon, I can take it or leave it. Usually I leave it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha! I’m glad the title attracted your attention. That’s what I was aiming for! Thanks very much for your kind words. I really enjoy writing so it’s nice to hear that you also get enjoyment from reading my posts. I’m still trying to find my feet with blogging. I have the first episode of your podcast downloaded, ready to listen 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to serialjetsetter Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: